Press Release: Uplift Joins Native American Tribes in Calling For President Obama to Protect Bears Ears As A National Monument


July 15, 2016


Young leaders across the Colorado Plateau thank the Administration for convening a public meeting in Bluff, Utah to discuss ways to best protect the area. We urge officials from the U.S. Department of Interior and the U.S. Forest Service to recommend that President Obama protect the Bears Ears region in Southeastern Utah as a national monument.

The Bears Ears Buttes framed with summer wild flowers. Photographer: Tim Peterson

The Bears Ears Buttes framed with summer wild flowers. Photographer: Tim Peterson


“For my generation, protecting Bears Ears is a chance for healing past injustices and restoring respect to tribes,” said Brooke Larsen, Uplift Organizer from Salt Lake City. “Protecting Bears Ears is a necessary step towards more diverse and inclusive public lands.” 


The Bears Ears region is the ancestral homeland of many southwestern indigenous tribes and a landscape with more than 100,000 Native American cultural sites. Yet, it remains unprotected despite decades of efforts to safeguard this area.


“I first understood the depth of Native American history in the Bears Ears region while hiking the Grand Gulch. From the San Juan River, one experiences hundreds of pieces of painted and coiled-clay pottery, myriad granaries and dwellings built into cliffs, and faded hand-prints and shamanic figures staring down from sandstone walls,” said Marcel Gaztambide, Uplift Organizer from Salt Lake City. “The littered beer cans, candy wrappers, and other human refuse made the need for enhanced protection obvious. The value and fragility of this place demands monument status.”

Petroglyph graces the Comb Ridge. Photographer: Josh Ewing

Petroglyph graces the Comb Ridge. Photographer: Josh Ewing


The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has recently stated that they are currently investigating nearly a half dozen looting and vandalism cases in the area, highlighting the urgent need to protect Bears Ears now.


In addition, the area faces growing threats from oil and gas development and potash and uranium mining. Such development would permanently damage this culturally and ecologically important landscape.


“Keeping all fossil fuels in the ground may be unrealistic, but our leaders must have the courage to protect our most sacred and wild places from the destruction of extraction,” said Larsen. “The deep time of the red rock inspires hope in our capacity for restraint.”
In 2016, a coalition of five sovereign Native American Tribal Nations requested that President Obama protect the area as a national monument. This effort has support from the outdoor recreation industry and other business leaders, archeologists, communities of faith, and conservation groups. In addition, recent polls showed that 71 percent of Utahans support a Bears Ears National Monument.  

 “I moved to the Southwest and began working to protect public lands because of the Bears Ears region,” said Claire Martini, Uplift Coordinator. “As young people, we rely on the actions of our elders to make our future better. Bears Ears is a tremendous opportunity for the President to safeguard our cultural heritage and environmental quality for future generations.”

Fall color in the Abajo Mountains. Photographer: Tim Peterson

Fall color in the Abajo Mountains. Photographer: Tim Peterson


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Uplift, a youth-organized climate action community, was formed in partnership with the Grand Canyon Trust and the Landscape Conservation Initiative in November 2014 to empower and unite young leaders to address critical environmental issues across the Colorado Plateau. The youth-directed movement that emerged from these efforts, Uplift Climate Conference, has worked to elevate youth voices and support creative discussion to help further the climate movement. This year’s conference is August 18-20 in Durango, CO. The inaugural conference was held in Flagstaff in April 2015.