Indigenous Land Struggle in Kenya's Mau Forest

Indigenous Land Struggle in Kenya's Mau Forest

“A long fought for victory in the struggle for indigenous land rights in Eastern Africa has been underway over the course of the past few weeks in Southern Kenya. The Maasai Mau Forest, East Africa’s largest and most important watershed and a site of incredible cultural and ecological significance, is finally being liberated from the thousands of settlers who have been occupying and desecrating it under the orders of the current neocolonial government since the onset of the 1950’s. […] ”

Uplifting Communities on the Colorado Plateau in the Fight for Climate Justice

Uplifting Communities on the Colorado Plateau in the Fight for Climate Justice

“Uplift is a movement of young people on the Colorado Plateau who are actively working for climate justice in the Southwest. Uplift 2018, a conference unlike many others, helped to facilitate the regional climate justice movement. Set up on Cedro Peak Campground near Albuquerque, New Mexico, the climate justice conference included plenty of spaces for connection with the land, other conference-goers, and oneself. […]”

Land Protection: Conservation as the War We Wage Against Ourselves

Land Protection: Conservation as the War We Wage Against Ourselves

“My first memory of the land is a sunburnt mesa. Blue sky and orange dirt. The sky is visible from horizon to horizon, vibrant and unimpeded. I look up and see a brush stroke of thin, milky blue clouds that swirl in unison with the orange underneath me. The texture of the dirt is dynamic, producing reverberations of grit between my toes and softness underneath my arches. Every grain is its own hue, small pieces of glass that are translucent when held to the sun.”

Furthering A Consciousness of Love and Justice

Furthering A Consciousness of Love and Justice

“It’s a bright and breezy afternoon in Flagstaff and I’ve spent the morning drinking coffee with a human friend and three pup friends. I’m getting really excited about leaving next week for a yoga teacher training in Costa Rica. I’ve been committed to a yoga practice for the last several years, but I am feeling a renewed curiosity: why is this work my work? how can I practice yoga with a decolonial framework? what does my yoga practice mean to me, particularly in this moment of feeling immersed in thinking about climate chaos and living on the Colorado Plateau?”

From regional to international, Uplifters battle for climate justice

From regional to international, Uplifters battle for climate justice

"On Sunday November 5th, thousands dawned white jumpsuits and marched towards the last coal mine in Bonn, Germany, occupying it for the full day and shutting down operations completely. This beautifully executed civil uprising, called Ende Gelände (which means “Here and no further” in German), was one of the largest demonstrations of its kind. I had the opportunity to march alongside German activists with other Uplifters and reflect in awe about the scale of people power and potential for saving our climate through mass uprising. […]”

Introducing the 2017 Uplift Climate Conference!

Introducing the 2017 Uplift Climate Conference!

“One could say Uplift has been millions of years in the making. The major uplift which lifted the Colorado Plateau from sea-level to several thousand feet, the continental drift that moved the Plateau from the equator, and that separated the Plateau from Pangea to the American continent, all came together to physically place the Plateau where it is today. But these are just the geologic forces that made the Colorado Plateau. […]”

Camping is Not For Everyone

Camping is Not For Everyone

At my college, I am not just an environmental studies major, but I have been a mentor for our low-income/first generation college students for years. One of the many things I have realized as a poor environmentalist, is that many of our low-income/first generation students do not participate in our Outdoor Education Center (OEC), not even in the trips. Although they do a lot to reach out to us, letting students borrow expensive gear and subsidizing expensive trips, I don’t even use the center. I think I know why.

Meet Your New Uplift Coordinator!

Meet Your New Uplift Coordinator!

Hello! My name is Eva Malis and I am 21 years old. I grew up in the sunny suburbs of Los Angeles County and was fortunate to spend many of my growing years romping through the Eastern Sierras. I have spent the more recent years of my life in the SF Bay Area as a UC Berkeley student, and have experienced the Colorado Plateau through the Doris Duke Conservation Scholars Program.

Love and Vibrancy Behind the Movement

Love and Vibrancy Behind the Movement

Meet Elea Ziegelbaum, an 18-year-old climate activist living in Flagstaff, Arizona. She is currently in her senior year of high school at Flagstaff Arts and Leadership Academy. We first met Elea when she walked into a Flagstaff community meeting last July, and have learned more about her work since Uplift in August 2016.  We asked her the following questions to get a better sense of the interplay between Uplift and other regional movements.

From the Colorado Plateau to COP22

From the Colorado Plateau to COP22

It’s been three months since Uplift’s powerful gathering of young climate justice activists from across the Colorado Plateau. Five of us who dreamed, schemed, and learned at Uplift now find ourselves bringing heart to COP22—the UN Climate Change Conference in Marrakech, Morocco.  When Kayla reflects on Uplift, she feels that Uplift “strives to incorporate the local voice and have difficult conversations connecting social issues to the environment.” 

 

Reading is a Radical Act

Reading is a Radical Act

A professor of mine once justified a syllabus comprised almost entirely of male writers with the flip comment that perhaps women had not yet written a "seminal" body of work. Therefore, women did not belong in the Western cannon. Now, I know this to be false. Yet it demonstrates how as women writers and women readers, we are tasked with shouldering the work to undo the sexism, racism, and classism upheld within the literary establishment.

Our Country's Twilight Zone

Our Country's Twilight Zone

In March, the Chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation traveled to Washington, D.C, in a fight for time. The Army Corps of Engineers had conveniently sidestepped a mandate by the National Historic Preservation Act that calls for tribal consultation in regions of sacred significance prior to any construction that could impact the area.

The Power of Connection

The Power of Connection

I remember the day that everything changed for me. I was eighteen years old and a first-timer to the mountain town of Flagstaff that I have called home for six years now. In 2010, destiny saw me involved in home weatherization efforts, bringing low-income community members into a program provided by the city. One of our outreach efforts involved a group of six of us (undergraduates, graduate students, and professors) door-knocking in a predominantly Latina/o part of town.

Press Release: Uplift Joins Native American Tribes in Calling For President Obama to Protect Bears Ears As A National Monument


July 15, 2016


Young leaders across the Colorado Plateau thank the Administration for convening a public meeting in Bluff, Utah to discuss ways to best protect the area. We urge officials from the U.S. Department of Interior and the U.S. Forest Service to recommend that President Obama protect the Bears Ears region in Southeastern Utah as a national monument.

  The Bears Ears Buttes framed with summer wild flowers. Photographer: Tim Peterson

The Bears Ears Buttes framed with summer wild flowers. Photographer: Tim Peterson


“For my generation, protecting Bears Ears is a chance for healing past injustices and restoring respect to tribes,” said Brooke Larsen, Uplift Organizer from Salt Lake City. “Protecting Bears Ears is a necessary step towards more diverse and inclusive public lands.” 


The Bears Ears region is the ancestral homeland of many southwestern indigenous tribes and a landscape with more than 100,000 Native American cultural sites. Yet, it remains unprotected despite decades of efforts to safeguard this area.


“I first understood the depth of Native American history in the Bears Ears region while hiking the Grand Gulch. From the San Juan River, one experiences hundreds of pieces of painted and coiled-clay pottery, myriad granaries and dwellings built into cliffs, and faded hand-prints and shamanic figures staring down from sandstone walls,” said Marcel Gaztambide, Uplift Organizer from Salt Lake City. “The littered beer cans, candy wrappers, and other human refuse made the need for enhanced protection obvious. The value and fragility of this place demands monument status.”

  Petroglyph graces the Comb Ridge. Photographer: Josh Ewing

Petroglyph graces the Comb Ridge. Photographer: Josh Ewing


The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has recently stated that they are currently investigating nearly a half dozen looting and vandalism cases in the area, highlighting the urgent need to protect Bears Ears now.


In addition, the area faces growing threats from oil and gas development and potash and uranium mining. Such development would permanently damage this culturally and ecologically important landscape.


“Keeping all fossil fuels in the ground may be unrealistic, but our leaders must have the courage to protect our most sacred and wild places from the destruction of extraction,” said Larsen. “The deep time of the red rock inspires hope in our capacity for restraint.”
In 2016, a coalition of five sovereign Native American Tribal Nations requested that President Obama protect the area as a national monument. This effort has support from the outdoor recreation industry and other business leaders, archeologists, communities of faith, and conservation groups. In addition, recent polls showed that 71 percent of Utahans support a Bears Ears National Monument.  

 “I moved to the Southwest and began working to protect public lands because of the Bears Ears region,” said Claire Martini, Uplift Coordinator. “As young people, we rely on the actions of our elders to make our future better. Bears Ears is a tremendous opportunity for the President to safeguard our cultural heritage and environmental quality for future generations.”

  Fall color in the Abajo Mountains. Photographer: Tim Peterson

Fall color in the Abajo Mountains. Photographer: Tim Peterson


###

Uplift, a youth-organized climate action community, was formed in partnership with the Grand Canyon Trust and the Landscape Conservation Initiative in November 2014 to empower and unite young leaders to address critical environmental issues across the Colorado Plateau. The youth-directed movement that emerged from these efforts, Uplift Climate Conference, has worked to elevate youth voices and support creative discussion to help further the climate movement. This year’s conference is August 18-20 in Durango, CO. The inaugural conference was held in Flagstaff in April 2015.

Let's be real

6 "Learning Experiences" from the Uplift process

By Claire Martini

 

In any given room, Uplifters may not have the most academic degrees, years of experience, or published papers, but let’s get something straight: Our action is rooted in love for this place, sacred rage regarding the threats, and a need to protect our communities. We don’t know everything, but living here teaches us enough to start.


When I tell people about Uplift, often they’re interested in outcomes. They want to know: How many people did you reach? What have you accomplished? I cringe at the implication of "deliverables." Because as I’ve come to appreciate, the process is often one of the best parts.


Uplift began with little more than the idea of shaping conservation by “doing something” with young people. At the first Uplift planning retreat in fall of 2014, we took markers to oversized blank pages and combined our visions to put on the inaugural Uplift gathering in April 2015. Almost 100 people showed up! The discussion of conservation as it pertains to young desert dwellers on the Colorado Plateau impressed our sponsors enough to make them invest in Uplift again, and now we're honing in on climate change and the need for enhanced collaboration across the region. Uplift is growing!


But it's not always an easy ride. Along the way, our Uplift organizers (a dynamic and mostly volunteer team) have had some pretty hilarious moments. In the name of transparency, we want to share them with you.


Check out six moments we affectionately call "learning experiences" from the Uplift organizing process:

  Remind me, where's home?

Remind me, where's home?

1. One of our team members has moved a grand total of 6 times since November. We're talking big, interstate moves. It's the perfect illustration of why our demographic is hard to organize. Young people are transient! Life happens. And we've got a lot of it unfolding.

When we’re moving around and working crazy hours at our day jobs, staying connected means…

 
  Slack-ing all day.

Slack-ing all day.

2. Using Slack to stay in touch. So. Many. Messages. To be exact, we've sent 2.9K since November. Current emoji totals unknown.

 
  Welcome to the struggle bus.

Welcome to the struggle bus.


3.    We’re trying to get hip with the times and reach out to more people through social media. But sometimes, that doesn’t go so well…like when we had trouble getting Facebook to display the right time zone for an event.

 
  Uplifters Anonymous.

Uplifters Anonymous.

4.    We brought Uplift on the road! Which was a success overall, but some meetings looked like this for a while…which taught us we had to up our communication and collaboration with partners on the ground.

Community organizing happens by building relationships, one conversation at a time. Listen in on the conversation in Moab.

 

5.    Conference calls. These can be productive. Or, they can be ridiculous. A favorite moment of mine was when Brooke and I were calling in from the BLM offices in Salt Lake City, another organizer from rural Maine, and one team member took the call from a noisy coffee shop in Flagstaff. Midway through giving an update on the program, she yelped “Biscotti! In my coffee! I just dropped my biscotti in my coffee!” Typical conference call. If you haven’t seen this spoof, watch it. It’s too real.

So, why is it worth it?


Growing Uplift to where it is now has taken years, sweat, and a few tears along the way. But we’re honoring the process of Uplift by sticking with it, even when things don’t turn out exactly perfect because we still believe that “doing something” is the best place to start. Take the first step by joining us this August 18-20 in Durango! Don't forget your sass.

Meme: "an idea, behavior, or style that spreads from person to person"

Attention, young lovers of public land! If you hike, bike, camp, climb, farm, boat, or study in the West, we'd like to hear what public lands mean to you. Share your words and images!

Why? We're making memes to spread the word about Uplift and climate justice to tell the world (or at least the internet) that young people care about Western public lands.

What we'd like:

1.    Your name, age, and hometown

2.    A glamour shot of YOU on public lands

3.    Answers to one or more of these questions:

  • Why are you excited about Uplift?

  • For me, climate justice is…

  • Why us (youth), why now?

  • What does the Colorado Plateau mean to you?

  • What do public lands mean to you?

We'll post submissions we receive to Instagram and Facebook, and you'll be helping us get the word out about Uplift. See ideas of what we're looking for:

 

Meme: “an idea, behavior, or style that spreads from person to person”

We can't wait to hear what you have to say! Please send your photos and answers to uplift@grandcanyontrust.org